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Teething treatments provider in Southport

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Tiny Tots Tooth Development

3 to 6 months - While babies drool for many reasons, teething is one of the most common causes at this age, since teeth commonly make their first appearance during these months. If your baby follows the typical pattern of teething (if there is such a thing), you will likely see the bottom, centre teeth erupt first, followed by the two upper front teeth and then the two on either side of them.

Having said that, for some babies, it will be months before their first tooth erupts, and for others, they will show up in a completely different order. Some may come in all at once, while others take their own sweet time and then poke through one at a time.

While parents often assume teething causes their babies’ fevers, this is not a standard accepted cause of fever by most health professionals - at least not for anything more than a low-grade fever. It may help to give your baby hard things to chew. You should discuss the use of medicines or other teething treatments and remedies with your baby's doctor.

6 to 9 months - You will likely see the appearance of several teeth during this time period, if you haven't seen some already. With that said, some babies don't have their first tooth erupt until after their first birthday. In addition to discussing the use of medicines or other teething treatments and remedies with your baby's doctor, be sure you discuss recommended dental care as well.

12 to 18 months - Getting your 12 to 18-month-old accustomed to brushing their teeth (and having you brush them as well) will help teach them good habits for the future. While toothpaste is not recommended for children this age because they inevitably swallow it, starting to take your child to see a dentist who is experienced in the care of children's teeth is definitely a good idea.

18 to 24 months - Since most 2-year-olds want to exert their independence at every turn, try not to make brushing teeth a battle at this age. And, while toothpaste is not recommended because toddlers are still young enough to want to swallow it, it's definitely a good idea to take your child to see a dentist who is experienced in the care of children's teeth.

2 years - It is definitely time to schedule a visit with a dentist who is experienced in seeing children, if you haven't already. Between 2 and 3, your child's primary teeth will most likely finish coming in, and home dental care becomes even more important as you help your child establish good lifelong habits.

Remember that this is the age of independence so let your child brush their own teeth before going over them yourself. Toothpaste isn't necessary at this stage, but if your toddler likes or insists on it, you can help to make sure that she puts only a very small amount onto the brush.

3 years - Make sure that you remember to schedule your child for regular dental check-ups, sometimes recommended as often as every six months at this age.

Between visits, make sure to teach your child to brush after meals and avoid excessive amounts of sugary foods.

4 years - Remember to schedule your child for regular dental check-ups, recommended as often as every six months at this age. Between visits, continue to encourage your child to brush after meals and avoid excessive amounts of sugary foods.

While it is likely to be another year or two before the baby teeth fall out and the permanent ones come in, it is just as important to learn to take care of this set as it will be to take care of the adult ones.

5 to 6 years - Regular dental check-ups are in order, both to teach good home care and to detect early dental problems. You might want to consider taking your child to a paediatric dentist who has two years of additional training in child behavior and dental health, or someone who is accustomed to caring for children.

About teeth

Throughout your life, you will have two sets of teeth: primary (baby) teeth and secondary (permanent) teeth. At age 6-8 months, the primary teeth appear; all 20 are in place by age 3.

Permanent teeth will begin to grow around age 6, and all are present between ages 12 and 14, with the exception of wisdom teeth. The next teeth to grow in are the 12-year molars and finally the wisdom teeth. Wisdom teeth typically begin breaking through from age 17 and on. The total number of permanent teeth is 32, though few people have room for all 32 teeth and this is why wisdom teeth are usually removed.

Your front teeth are called incisors. The sharp "fang-like" teeth are canines. The next side teeth are referred to as pre-molars or bicuspids, and the back teeth are molars. Your permanent teeth are the ones you keep for life, so it is vital that they are brushed and flossed regularly and that periodic check-ups by a dentist are followed

First visit

On your first visit you will be welcomed into our practice where we will discuss your dental needs and concerns. Our philosophy is to ensure that all patients are informed about the treatment options available and fully understand the procedures involved, giving you plenty of opportunity to ask as many questions as you like.

Our initial examination consists of checking your gums and each tooth individually, before taking an x-ray (screening your mouth for tooth decay, gum disease and/or oral cancers etc.) and commencing your treatment as needed.

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